A week with The Baton in Norfolk

Today is Memorial Day in the United States; a day to pause and remember the fallen and honour their memory. It is an occasion when the pain of the battlefield can bubble to the surface.

A week ago I took The Baton to the drop-in morning at the Britannia Centre in Norwich which is now a hub for Veterans’ Services in Norfolk. The Baton is made from the handle of a stretcher used for medical evacuations on the battlefield in Afghanistan. We continue to carry it, with care and concern, to honour the fallen and the wounded. At first the veterans at the drop-in looked nonplussed at the strange object in my hand, then I started talking about The Baton and the penny dropped. One person when I handed it to them could not hold back their tears.

The Britannia Centre at Norwich Prison brings together The Walnut Tree Trust, The Matthew Project’s Outside the Wire service and Walking with the Wounded’s Project Nova. Between them they are supporting veterans and their families with mental health support, drug and alcohol advice and counselling as well as support for those in the criminal justice system. They are working closely with many other charities. While I was there I met someone from the Warrior Programme which runs an effective education and training course. A prison officer with responsibility for mentally disordered offenders called in for coffee and a catch-up; the local community Police officer also called in to see whether there was anything that he could do to help. It was so encouraging to see genuine interagency working with the veterans’ needs paramount.

I went on from there to visit David Miller who is planning an expedition to the Arctic to raise awareness and funds for the RAF Benevolent Fund. They provided vital support for his brother who has a back injury with severe pain and PTSD. He told me about the long and frightening journey his brother has had to survive and the terrible misunderstandings that led to Police brutality when he went off the rails. It was a clear illustration of the very real need for the services of the Britannia Centre in every town and city. It was good to let David hold The Baton; as the family member of a wounded veteran he really understood what it represents.

Then on Wednesday I took The Baton to the University of East Anglia Community Engagement Event. It gave me an opportunity to talk about the good work happening in Norfolk for veterans and to share The Baton message with academics and students. I reflected at the time that it was a bit daunting to stand beside very clever scientists and professors, but The Baton gave me courage. One academic colleague from the Law School told me about her close friend whose son has severe PTSD. He’s just 21 she said, with tears in her eyes.

We must never stop reminding people that they have the freedom to research, to study, to express an opinion because of the sacrifices of our forces. Many have paid, and will continue to pay, a heavy price for those freedoms.

www.thebaton.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/walnuttreeproject/?fref=ts

http://walkingwiththewounded.org.uk/how-we-help/wwtw-special-projects/project-nova/

http://www.matthewproject.org/adult-team/outside-the-wire

http://www.warriorprogramme.org.uk

https://www.uea.ac.uk/community-university-engagement/awards/deborah-Harrison

 

 

 

 

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