A New Year’s Resolution isn’t just for Christmas…

On January 8th I blogged about my good intentions to adopt a healthier lifestyle, saying that I had no health problems and just wanted to feel fitter. Then I had a warning about my cholesterol level from my GP, at the top end of the average range it was placing me at over 10% risk of having a heart attack or stroke. I declined to take statins after talking it through with him, basing that decision on my new lifestyle changes. At that stage I was successfully being alcohol free, eating healthily and attending my twice weekly exercise class. I was feeling smug.

Things haven’t quite gone to plan. The twice weekly exercise class remained a challenge, but I kept going and achieved a little more each week. The pain and discomfort after each class however did not improve. Longstanding problems with my joints, and my back in particular, were being aggravated. After another chat with my GP, I took his advice to stop going. The exercises were too high impact, even with my adjustments. It felt like a failure to stop attending because it had been such a big deal for me to do something like that.

During this time I was teaching 1st year occupational therapy students at the University of East Anglia about the connection between well-being and occupation. Their energy and creativity was shared in my last blog. One of the lectures was about how we all need to become more physically active generally in our lives and it doesn’t need an expensive gym membership to get fit. By small changes to every day routines we can get exercise. So I had to apply those principles to my own life. I love to walk and it doesn’t cause me pain, so more walking it had to be. I enjoy my long walks with the dog at the weekend, but this needed to be more regular.

Every day I now park my car a 15 minute walk away from where I work. It avoids a 10 minute queue in traffic so also helps to reduce my carbon emissions. On cold, wet mornings I almost give in to the temptation to drive all the way to the university campus, the car is warm and Kiss on the radio is highly entertaining. Then I remember that I need the exercise; so many people face far greater challenges than me and manage to keep fit. One of my inspirations is Mark Ormrod. He was in the Royal Marines and got blown up in Afghanistan. Three of his limbs were amputated and this does not stop him from working on his fitness every day. He is such a motivator for me when my inclination is to be lazy. I’m also walking a little faster and the last stage of the journey is up a small hill (this is Norfolk we’re talking about) so I try not to slow down to a plod.

I’ve been fighting a sense of disappointment that I couldn’t do everything that I set out to do, but I have to remind myself what I have achieved. The healthy eating is going fairly well, with loads more salad, vegetables and fruit included every day. I take a salad to work instead of a doorstep cheese sandwich. I couldn’t keep off the alcohol completely, I do love a glass of red wine, but I’ve halved how much I drink. The challenge now is to keep going, but really I have no choice. There’s still so much that I want to do with my life; I need to be fit and well, not just for New Year but for always.

To find out more about the health benefits of walking follow Sarah Hanson on Twitter – @walkingresearch. Sarah is a PhD student at Norwich Medical School, UEA, researching walking groups within the natural environment to improve health.

Mark Ormrod’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/markormrodmotivationalspeaker/?fref=ts

 

 

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3 thoughts on “A New Year’s Resolution isn’t just for Christmas…

  1. Pingback: A well-trodden testimony | JEBounford

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